Microsoft wants you to stop using Internet Explorer

Microsoft wants you to stop using Internet Explorer Do you still use Internet Explorer? If so, a top cybersecurity expert with Microsoft has a simple message for you – Stop or at least stop using it for everything.

Microsoft wants you to stop using Internet Explorer

Microsoft wants you to stop using Internet Explorer

We all dread using Internet Explorer, but some businesses and organisations still use the good old browser because they can’t help it.

Microsoft killed off the Internet Explorer brand nearly four years ago, choosing Edge as its modern browser for Windows 10.

Internet Explorer lived on as plumbing for Windows and for business compatibility, but Microsoft isn’t supporting it with new web standards – it’s legacy code.

The internet users are huge fans of using Chrome, Firefox, or Edge.The reason why some companies are sticking to Internet Explorer is because it supports legacy web apps.

However, this incurs additional costs for the enterprises as they opt for the convenient method rather than implementing modern browser approach.

Why Microsoft wants you to stop using Internet Explorer?

Microsoft Windows Principal Architect Chris Jackson urged companies to migrate to modern browsers instead of using IE as their default.

He explained that ‘The perils of using Internet Explorer as your default browser’ means the use of Internet Explorer is increasing the technical debt for the companies.

The ‘technical debt by default’ approach means if you create a brand-new webpage today, run it in the local intranet zone, and don’t add any additional markup, you will end up using a 1999 implementation of web standards by default.

As per the statement of the company “If we continued our previous approach, you would end up in a scenario where, by optimizing for the things you have, you end up not being able to use new apps as they come out.

As new apps are coming out with greater frequency, what we want to help you do is avoid having to miss out on a progressively larger portion of the web”.

Jackson’s warning is an appropriate one, but Microsoft’s Edge solution hasn’t been good enough.

Microsoft delivered its Edge browser by coupling it to Windows 10 nearly four years ago, but the software giant hasn’t delivered a compelling experience for consumers or businesses.

Edge was also not available on Windows 7 or Windows 8, further complicating things for IT admins.

The new Chromium-powered version of its Edge browser

Microsoft is now building a Chromium-powered version of its Edge browser that will be available for testing in the coming weeks.

It’s being decoupled from Windows 10, and businesses will be able to install Edge on Windows 7 or Windows 8.

That should help push businesses to move on from Internet Explorer, but it will still take years for legacy web apps to truly disappear.

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